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HHS Recovery Act Recipient Reporting Readiness Tool

Step 4. Review and Copy the Grant Awards Data

TAGGS provides some – but not all – of the data needed for the Recipient Report. Recipients are responsible for directly collecting and reporting all required data to FederalReporting.gov. Data that HHS does not currently collect are highlighted in yellow. Do not copy this highlighted information. Please enter the appropriate data for your organization in these required fields. For assistance with entering these data please contact FederalReporting.gov.

You may capture the data HHS does provide by copying data from this screen and pasting it into the reporting format of your choice, such as the Excel spreadsheet template, the XML template, or by logging into the online form. For assistance with copying and pasting these data please contact our help desk at 866-814-5703.

 

Award Detail for: HEALTH AND HIV AMONG GAY FATHERS
SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIV
DUNS Number: 942514985
1600 HOLLOWAY AVENUE
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94132-1722
Recipient Report: Grant or Loan
Prime Recipient

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Reporting Information
Award Type Award Number Final Report
Grant 1R21MH084760-01A1 Recipient responsible for this data

Award Recipient Information
Recipient DUNS Number Recipient Account Number Recipient Congressional District
942514985 Recipient responsible for this data 12

Award Information
Funding Agency Code Awarding Agency Code Award Date
7529 7529 08-12-2009
Amount of Award Sub Account Number for Program Source (TAS)  
$ 220,776 Recipient responsible for this data
Program Source (TAS)* CFDA Number 
750907 93.701
Total Number of Sub Awards to Individuals Total Amount of Sub Awards to Individuals
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Total Number of Payments to Vendors less than $25,000/award Total Amount of Payments to Vendors less than $25,000/award
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Total Number of Sub Awards less than $25,000/award Total Amount of Sub Awards less than $25,000/award
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Award Description
DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Growing epidemiologic research demonstrates that gay men are a vulnerable group, at higher risk for HIV, substance use, and depression, relative to their heterosexual counterparts. Experts in the field have noted that this "syndemic" of interrelated risks is likely the result of structural and cultural challenges posed by growing up and living as a member of a marginalized group. Thus, the sociological trend of increasing parenthood among a population at high risk for a variety of negative health outcomes raises multiple questions for public health, perhaps the most important of which is, What impact will parenthood have on the existing vulnerabilities within this community? Having children marks an important developmental transition for any individual, regardless of his or her sexual orientation. This transition radically reshapes an individual's life across multiple levels: changes occur to the individuals themselves, to the couple and their relationship dynamics (when parenthood occurs in a couple), and to the larger social network in which the parent exists. These changes have the potential to profoundly affect any parent's health, both for better and for worse. And when these changes occur in the life of a gay man, the stakes are higher still, as their pre-existing risks for HIV, substance use, and psychological distress interact with these life changes in ways that are poorly understood. Thus, parenthood has great potential to be both a source of protection and of danger for gay men. For example, research indicates that the transition to parenthood marks a low point for most couples in relationship satisfaction and frequency of sexual contact. While strict societal norms regarding fidelity protect many heterosexual couples during this challenging period, the relative acceptability of nonmonogamy among gay men might facilitate additional sexual contact outside the relationship, and the relatively higher incidence of HIV and STDs means that those contacts each carry greater risk for disease. However, parenthood might also mitigate other risks. For example, research has shown that the demands of caring for a child force a natural form of lifestyle regulation, which provide for fewer opportunities for parents to drink heavily or use substances. In a community with documented higher prevalence of substance use and abuse, this lifestyle regulation may be especially protective. Understanding the nuances of how parenthood intersects with gay men's unique vulnerabilities will be essential to developing interventions and public health practice to support this growing population of families. No study that we are aware of has examined how parenthood might function as a protective and/or risk factor for gay men's health and well-being. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The proposed study will have significant health impact for gay fathers. Specifically, we will identify psychological and behavioral factors that help prevent fathers from HIV risk, substance abuse and psychological distress as they navigate the myriad life-changing situations faced as parents. Additionally, factors associated with gay father's increased vulnerability to HIV risk, substance abuse and psychological distress will also be identified.

Project Information
Project Name or
Project/Program Title
Project Status Total Federal Amount ARRA Funds
Received/Invoiced
HEALTH AND HIV AMONG GAY FATHERS Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Number of Jobs Description of Jobs Created
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Quarterly Activities/Project Description
Recipient responsible for this data
 
Activity Code (NAICS or NTEE-NPC)
1Recipient responsible for this data2Recipient responsible for this data
3Recipient responsible for this data4Recipient responsible for this data
5Recipient responsible for this data6Recipient responsible for this data
7Recipient responsible for this data8Recipient responsible for this data
9Recipient responsible for this data10Recipient responsible for this data
Total Federal Amount of ARRA
Expenditure
Total Federal ARRA
Infrastructure Expenditure
Infrastructure Contact Name
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Infrastructure Contact Email Infrastructure Contact Phone Infrastructure Contact Phone Ext.
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Infrastructure Contact Street Address 1 Infrastructure Contact Street Address 2 Infrastructure Contact Street Address 3
1600 HOLLOWAY AVENUE Not Available Recipient responsible for this data
Infrastructure City Infrastructure State Infrastructure ZIP Code+4
SAN FRANCISCO CA 94132-1722
Infrastructure Purpose and Rationale
Recipient responsible for this data

Primary Place of Performance
Street Address 1 Street Address 2 City
Not Available Recipient responsible for this data SAN FRANCISCO
State Zip Code+4 Congressional District
CA 94312 12
Country  
US

Recipient Highly Compensated Officers
Prime Recipient Indication of Reporting Applicability # Officer Name Officer Compensation
Recipient responsible for this data 1 Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
2 Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
3 Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
4 Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
5 Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data

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The information provided by this tool is baseline data that the Recipient should include in the Recipient Report that must be submitted to FederalReporting.gov beginning October 1, 2009. The data from this tool can be cut and pasted directly into the Recipient Report.