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HHS Recovery Act Recipient Reporting Readiness Tool

Step 4. Review and Copy the Grant Awards Data

TAGGS provides some – but not all – of the data needed for the Recipient Report. Recipients are responsible for directly collecting and reporting all required data to FederalReporting.gov. Data that HHS does not currently collect are highlighted in yellow. Do not copy this highlighted information. Please enter the appropriate data for your organization in these required fields. For assistance with entering these data please contact FederalReporting.gov.

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Award Detail for: CHROMATIN MODIFICATIONS AND VULNERABILITY TO GLUTAMATE TOXICITY
GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY
DUNS Number: 049515844
37TH & O STREETS, NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20057
Recipient Report: Grant or Loan
Prime Recipient

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Reporting Information
Award Type Award Number Final Report
Grant 1R21NS056057-01A2 Recipient responsible for this data

Award Recipient Information
Recipient DUNS Number Recipient Account Number Recipient Congressional District
049515844 Recipient responsible for this data Not Available

Award Information
Funding Agency Code Awarding Agency Code Award Date
7529 7529 05-01-2009
Amount of Award Sub Account Number for Program Source (TAS)  
$ 191,875 Recipient responsible for this data
Program Source (TAS)* CFDA Number 
750901 93.701
Total Number of Sub Awards to Individuals Total Amount of Sub Awards to Individuals
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Total Number of Payments to Vendors less than $25,000/award Total Amount of Payments to Vendors less than $25,000/award
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Total Number of Sub Awards less than $25,000/award Total Amount of Sub Awards less than $25,000/award
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Award Description
DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Excessive activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors increases oxidative stress, which contributes to the neurodegeneration observed following neurological insults such as ischemia and seizures, as well as contributes to neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, etc.). From a clinical perspective, it is a clear threat to brain function and to survival. It is believed that generation of reactive oxygen species and ensuing oxidative stress is a major contributor to glutamate toxicity. At the same time, oxidative stress is a major cause of DNA damage, which is also a common component of neuronal injury. DNA damage may contribute to neuronal loss and injury not only after acute brain insults but also under various chronic neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and Parkinson's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ataxia telangiectasia and many other neurological disorders. The most lethal form of DNA damage, the double strand breaks (DSBs), and the ability of cells to repair them has not yet been directly demonstrated following excessive stimulation of glutamate receptors. While limited evidence suggests the importance of DSBs and their repair machinery in vulnerability to glutamate-induced injury, no systematic direct studies have been done in mature neurons. We have developed a sensitive model to start addressing the role of DSB DNA damage in neuronal vulnerability to glutamate-mediated insults using phosphorylation of histone variant H2A.X, which occurs rapidly following DNA DSBs. Our general working hypothesis is that the consequences of unrepaired DSBs in terminally differentiated neurons are critical contributors to neuronal demise in the aftermath of excessive excitation. Conversely, successful repair of these breaks may increase neuronal survival following glutamate-driven insults. Specific Aims will test the following specific hypotheses aiming at proving this concept: 1) Increased phosphorylation of histone H2AX following activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors will result in increased DSB repair; this hypothesis we will tested by measuring DSB repair activity in rat cortical neuronal cultures; 2) Impairment of H2AX phosphorylation will result in increased glutamate toxicity due to the disruption of the DSB repair pathway. To test this, we will examine vulnerability of neurons from H2AX-/- transgenic mice to vulnerability to glutamate toxicity and evaluate their DSB repair capabilities. We expect that H2AX-/- neurons will be more vulnerable to glutamate toxicity and demonstrate diminished DSB repair as compared to wild-type cells. Moreover, we will reconstitute functional histone H2AX in H2AX-/- neurons using lentiviral expression and evaluate the restoration of their resistance to glutamate toxicity. Testing these hypotheses may reveal a novel common mechanism contributing to neurotoxicity in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, will lead to identification of attractive new targets for therapy of these disorders, and will lay a foundation for future interventional studies in vivo targeting DSB repair pathway in neurons. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Damage to DNA is a common component of neuronal injury. It may contribute to neuronal loss and injury not only after acute brain insult (e.g., prolonged seizures, stroke, TBI) but also under various chronic neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ataxia telangiectasia, among other neurological disorders that currently have no effective cure. Excessive excitation also contributes to many of these pathologies and is believed to be the major cause of DNA damage. However, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the excitation- driven formation of the most lethal type of DNA damage (double strand breaks) in neurons and the ability of nerve cells to withstand this damage. This proposal will examine these mechanisms and will lay the foundation for identification of new targets for therapy of a broad variety of neurological conditions relevant to excitotoxicity.

Project Information
Project Name or
Project/Program Title
Project Status Total Federal Amount ARRA Funds
Received/Invoiced
CHROMATIN MODIFICATIONS AND VULNERABILITY TO GLUTAMATE TOXICITY Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Number of Jobs Description of Jobs Created
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Quarterly Activities/Project Description
Recipient responsible for this data
 
Activity Code (NAICS or NTEE-NPC)
1Recipient responsible for this data2Recipient responsible for this data
3Recipient responsible for this data4Recipient responsible for this data
5Recipient responsible for this data6Recipient responsible for this data
7Recipient responsible for this data8Recipient responsible for this data
9Recipient responsible for this data10Recipient responsible for this data
Total Federal Amount of ARRA
Expenditure
Total Federal ARRA
Infrastructure Expenditure
Infrastructure Contact Name
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Infrastructure Contact Email Infrastructure Contact Phone Infrastructure Contact Phone Ext.
Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
Infrastructure Contact Street Address 1 Infrastructure Contact Street Address 2 Infrastructure Contact Street Address 3
37TH & O STREETS, NW Not Available Recipient responsible for this data
Infrastructure City Infrastructure State Infrastructure ZIP Code+4
WASHINGTON DC 20057
Infrastructure Purpose and Rationale
Recipient responsible for this data

Primary Place of Performance
Street Address 1 Street Address 2 City
3970 RESERVOIR RD, N.W. Recipient responsible for this data WASHINGTON
State Zip Code+4 Congressional District
DC 20057 Not Available
Country  
US

Recipient Highly Compensated Officers
Prime Recipient Indication of Reporting Applicability # Officer Name Officer Compensation
Recipient responsible for this data 1 Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
2 Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
3 Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
4 Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data
5 Recipient responsible for this data Recipient responsible for this data

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USE IN THE RECIPIENT REPORT

The information provided by this tool is baseline data that the Recipient should include in the Recipient Report that must be submitted to FederalReporting.gov beginning October 1, 2009. The data from this tool can be cut and pasted directly into the Recipient Report.